Your employer has a ‘duty of care’ to make sure, as far as possible, your health, safety and welfare while you’re at work. They should start with a risk assessment to spot possible health and safety hazards. They have to appoint a ‘competent person’ with health and safety responsibilities usually one of the owners in smaller firms, or a member of staff trained in health and safety.

A carbon monoxide detector, which can be purchased for around £20, can alert you to the presence of carbon monoxide in your home. You should ideally place one in every room where gas is being burned-for example, in the kitchen near a gas hob or beside a boiler. Opt for an audible detector, which works much like a smoke detector, alerting you via a loud noise. Be sure to test the detector regularly and replace the batteries as needed.

Statutory Instrument 2000 No. 128: The Pressure Systems Safety Regulations 2000 requires equipment to be examined regularly. HSE has advised owners and users of portable oxy-fuel welding and cutting sets that Written Schemes of Examination (Report of Thorough Examination) are not required. However, HSE emphasises that, although gas welding sets are not considered to pose a risk from the release of stored energy, they do pose a risk of fire or explosion if they are not assembled, operated or maintained correctly. Read extra details at https://www.weldingsuppliesdirect.co.uk/welding-equipment/cp7-cp47-gas-equipment-safety-inspections.html.

When things go wrong, gas can leak out of appliances and cause fire, explosions or carbon monoxide poisoning. To avoid dangerous gas leaks, all gas appliances should be fitted, maintained and serviced by qualified and Gas Safe registered professionals only. Whilst it’s important to have a professional tradesperson install and service your gas appliances, there are a number of checks you can make yourself and precautions you can take to make your home gas safe.